August 27, 2016


Shadowhand Dev Diary #7: Jewels and trinkets

from Grey Alien Games

Our RPG card game Shadowhand is set in the late 18th century. Then as now, jewellery was often symbolic, although tastes have changed in the last 250 years.

A lock of hair

Jewellery including woven hair from a loved one was very popular in the 18th century. In some cases these were memorial jewels with hair from someone who had died, but hair was not used exclusively in this way. Hair from a couple might be woven together, or sometimes a gift of hair jewellery was given with the giver’s initials included in the design, and a token of their hair inside.

Due to it’s unique properties, human hair can last hundreds or even thousands of years, which goes some way to explaining it’s use in jewellery as a lasting, sentimental material. In Shadowhand, this Heirloom Brooch is part of a deck of passive abilities, from which the player selects a mini-deck to suit their own playing strategy. It adds two zero cards to the draw pile, which gives a greater chance of getting a perfect score.

Secret compartment
Rings with a secret compartment are also known as “poison rings”. Rings in Shadowhand each give the player an extra “undo,” which they can use either to put right a mistake, or to get a sneaky look at the next card in the stock pile.

A sign of affection
Lady Cornelia receives the gift of an affection ring from her dear companion Mariah, as Mariah attempts to flee from a scandal and leaves Lady Cornelia behind. Mariah’s ring is set with garnets, which are symbolic of a quick return and separated love: In Greek mythology, Hades tricked Persephone into eating pomegranate seeds (the same colour as garnets) before she left him so that she would be compelled to return to him in the underworld for part of the year.

Eye see you
One of the most curious jewels of the Georgian era was the eye miniature. Admittedly this one is just a little ahead of it’s time since they became popular from the 1780s when the future George IV was known to own one. This part-portrait miniature was a secret gift for a lover, and was a private piece of jewellery.

In Shadowhand, the Eye Miniature power up confers a type of X-ray vision, which allows a player to plan ahead by seeing which card will be drawn next from the stock pile.




Episode 435: Happy Birthday Paul

from Casual Gamer Chick

No Gravatar

This episode was delayed a few days thanks to some acting work for Jonah Falcon. The podcast moving forward will be recorded on Wednesdays, partly because videogame releases are on Tuesdays. The guys also discuss the disaster No Man’s Sky has been.

This week’s news includes:

  • EA strongly hints that Mass Effect games will get remastered
  • No Man’s Sky’s PC patch is out now
  • NPD: 3DS, Xbox One, And GTA V lead brutal July slump

All this and Listener Feedback, too.

This episode was delayed a few days thanks to some acting work for Jonah Falcon. The podcast moving forward will be recorded on Wednesdays, partly because videogame releases are on Tuesdays. The guys also discuss the disaster No Man’s Sky has been. This week’s news includes: EA strongly hints that Mass Effect games will get remastered No Man’s Sky’s PC patch is out now NPD: 3DS, Xbox One, And GTA V lead brutal July slump All this and Listener Feedback, too.



August 23, 2016


World Uncovered and marathon run!

from Anawiki

Sometimes you travel, sometimes you run… And sometimes you travel to run :) Last week me and my friend Eliza traveled to Mierzecin. I traveled to root for her, she traveled to run in marathon. We both wore World Uncovered themed t-shirts. The event was hosted in spectacular woods, which happened to be a joy and trouble for runners. They simply got lost during the run and almost no-one finished the run. But still, it was lovely being there.

Eliza marathon World Uncovered run fog of world alternativeMarathon Mierzecin  run World Uncovered iOS App Store fog of world alternative

What is World Uncovered? World Uncovered tracks your travels for you and maps them in vivid detail. It will show you where you’ve been, how fast and how high you were going, and how often you’ve returned to your favorite places. Can you walk every block in your city? Climb all the mountains in your area? How many countries have you visited? What landmarks have you seen? Find out, with World Uncovered. It’s also the best alternative to Fog of World!

Download World Uncovered for iPhone from the App Store.



August 22, 2016


Klocki

from Jay Is Games

Platform: iOS, Android, Flash — Klocki I'll open this time with a confession: I really like puzzle games, mainly those that have simple idea and simple rules, and creates complex puzzles out of them. So when I found Klocki, by Maciej Targoni (aka Rainbow Train), I... Tagged as: android, browser, flash, free, game, ios, mac, puzzle, steam, windows



August 20, 2016


Farewell to Ace

from A Shareware Life

Yesterday our 17 year old cat Ace passed away. she was a great lapcat in her later years.

For 4 years she had suffered from kidney disease, but for the last 2 years we have been giving her fluids under the skin daily to keep her going and keep her quality of life high, which it was up until a few days ago.

The first picture is her as a kitten in October 1999 and the other is from just a couple of days ago.

Acekittentoy

Ace17toy



August 18, 2016


A goody life

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — A goody life You have only a few in-game days to create your life and a foundation for your future family. Your career choice now will affect your descendant's aptitude for athletics, academics, and creativity later. After your character dies, the "value" of... Tagged as: adventure, browser, flash, free, game, pixelart, sim, simulation, timemanagement



August 17, 2016


Gearing Up for Release: Platform-specific Issues, Part 2

from GBGames

Last time, I talked about Linux-specific issues to fix before my game’s release.

This time, I’ll address the issues I’m seeing on Android and Windows platforms.

Android: manual code signing

Quite frankly, between running the game on my phone and on my tablet, I haven’t seen any issues since I first tried to get my game built and installed on this platform. The main issue I had was figuring out which directory to save to, and I solved that issue.

Oh, and code signing was another solved issue. I can build and deploy debug builds by turning on developer mode on my devices, but the release build needed to be signed. As I am not using amazing IDEs that have one-touch buttons that do all sorts of fanciness, I had to figure it out myself from the documentation.

Luckily, the Android developer documentation for signing manually was fairly straightforward in this regard. In my CMakeLists.txt, I added a custom target called sign, which requires the location of my keystore and its alias. I created a few environment variables that I pass into my build, and the following is basically what’s needed as per the documentation:

ADD_CUSTOM_TARGET(sign
"echo" "================ SIGNING WITH KEY ================="
COMMAND "jarsigner" "-verbose" "-sigalg" "SHA1withRSA" "-digestalg" "SHA1" "-keystore" "${GB_KEYSTORE}" "bin/${ANDROID_APP_NAME}-release-unsigned.apk" "${GB_KEYSTORE_ALIAS}"
COMMAND "echo" "================ VERIFYING WITH JARSIGNER ================="
COMMAND "jarsigner" "-verify" "-verbose" "-certs" "bin/${ANDROID_APP_NAME}-release-unsigned.apk"
COMMAND "echo" "================ USING ZIPALIGN ================="
COMMAND "zipalign" "-v" "4" "bin/${ANDROID_APP_NAME}-release-unsigned.apk" "${ANDROID_APP_NAME}-release.apk"
WORKING_DIRECTORY "${PROJECT_BINARY_DIR}/android-project/")

Otherwise, I found porting to Android be very straightforward thanks to using the NDK and libSDL2-based libraries. If anything, I worry about scaling to different screen resolutions and device-specific compatibility problems due to the lack of devices I have to test on.

I’ve already signed up for the Google Play developer program, so the main piece to worry about is actually submitting my app to their store. How hard could it be?

Windows: persistence and font rendering

While GNU/Linux and Android are more or less the same, Windows is the odd duck.

I can easily cross-compile to create a Win32 build, and with my limited testing I found that the 32-bit version runs smoothly on a 64-bit system, so that’s good.

Since I don’t need to use a lot of memory, there’s no real advantage I can see to building a 64-bit version of my Windows port. The main downside would be an inability to support people on 32-bit systems, requiring that I provide both 32-bit and 64-bit binaries as I might need to do for the Linux-based package.

However, I did have to fix a few issues this past week that I didn’t know were there until someone tested it for me. Thanks, Rick!

I knew of an issue with using MinGW to cross-compile to Windows in which using std::cout would result in a crash. I never looked too hard into it because I only used cout for my own logging in order to find out what is happening, so I just commented them out when I released for Windows, usually for a Ludum Dare game.

Well, it turns out that there was still a crash, and I found that if I commented out the code that saved the current game state to a file, it would run just fine.

Was the known issue applicable to file stream operations, too? Luckily, gdb can be downloaded and run as a standalone applications on Windows, so I ran my game on Windows through gdb and read through the stack trace. It pointed to yaml-cpp.

I use yaml-cpp to save and load my game data, and it works very well. But why does it crash on Windows?

I found this thread on GitHub that mentioned a similar stack trace: Crashy shared object

It was closed without really being addressed, as the original poster gave up after seeing the issue disappear when using a later version of gcc.

Luckily, someone else found a different solution involving a change to a few lines in yaml-cpp’s code, although they said more tests are needed. I tried it, and it seemed to solve the problem for me, although I am a bit wary about not knowing what the change does or how it solves it. B-(

The other issue I found on Windows was that resizing the window results in the text looking completely wrong:

Leaf Raking Game Windows Text Corruption

All the other graphics look fine. Under the hood I am using SDL2_ttf, but using it directly isn’t showing this problem. I am using NFont, which does some caching, and I wonder if it is somehow being corrupted. I need to do some more tests, but this issue does not occur on my Ubuntu system, and Android doesn’t allow you to resize the screen dynamically at runtime, so it’s a Windows-specific issue so far.

I’ll continue looking into it, but updating to the latest version of NFont didn’t help. I tried updating my SDL2-related libaries next since some Windows 10-specific updates were made between the initial Windows runtime binaries and the latest release.

NFont’s creator Jonathan Dearborn has been running test apps I’ve sent him and sending back updates to try, and so far it seems we’re nearing a solution. Thanks for being so responsive, Jonny D!

The main major issue is signing my game’s binary. Windows 10’s SmartScreen puts up a warning about how they have protected your PC because they prevented the app from starting. It shows the binary as coming from Unknown Publisher.

That’s scary. I need to look into how to make it less scary. Does it require buying a code signing certificate, or is it similar to how Android’s code signing works? I don’t know yet, but I’m looking into it.

The other issue with Windows is that saving the game is sloooooow. In my game, I persist changes each time the player makes a major decision. Basically, if you click a button that switches to a different screen or causes something to happen in-game, I save so that if you shut the game down and reload it, it takes you back to where you were.

My Linux-based and Android-based builds are zippy. I can click, click, click, and any changes are instant. As a result, the game has been feeling very responsive despite the lack of a real-time need for it.

My Linux-based system does not have an SSD drive, and my wife’s Surface Pro does, and yet her system takes forever to save a file.

So on Windows, it feels less like click, click, click and more like click, wait, see screen update, then click. Because of the delay, sound effects are playing too early as well. It’s a lesser experience on Windows.

I haven’t ever needed to do multithreaded programming before as a single thread was usually plenty for the work I’ve ever done, but now I am wondering if I should spin of a thread specifically for writing to a file due to this issue that seems to be Windows-specific.

How Much Longer?

Ok, so there’s some technical issues, and some are easily surmountable, and some require some more investigation, and it’s possible there are some I haven’t run into yet.

Since Android seems the simplest to release, perhaps it goes into the Google Play store first, and I worry about the Linux and Windows versions later.

But I do not want this three month project to get to the ninth month before its first release.

The good news is that the next project will have a much clearer release plan, and many of these issues will be already solved. B-)




I broke the time

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — I broke the time I woke up today with a strange feeling. I looked in the phone and saw it is Wednesday. I made my coffee, looked at the calendar and saw it is Tuesday, opened the radio and listened to Friday's evening news.... Tagged as: browser, flash, free, game, platformer, ticklebot



August 15, 2016


Gearing Up for Release: Platform-specific Issues

from GBGames

I started a three-month project at the beginning of the year, and I’m now in the eighth month. I reported on the reasons why it was taking so long last month.

But I’m feeling pretty good about it, and while I still have some balance issues to work out, and it’s a bit ugly, I’m preparing for the actual release.

The thing is, I haven’t really done a serious release before, and since I want to do a simultaneous cross-platform release, I’m finding issues unique to each platform.

The platforms I currently support:

  • GNU/Linux
  • Android
  • Windows

What I want to support:

  • Mac OS X
  • iOS

I’ll start with Apple platforms, then talk about the environment I use natively. Other platforms will be discussed in the next post later this week.

Mac/iOS: no development or testing environments

I would love to create a Mac port. I know it is theoretically possible to create a cross-compiler to generate a Mac version, but it seems I need Mac-specific libraries, which requires owning a Mac.

I don’t own a Mac, and while I know of virtual Mac services you can subscribe to online, I haven’t bothered to look too seriously into them. I would also like to be able to test the game, and so I would need to use a Mac in order to see how it really runs, especially after running into the Windows-specific issues above.

As for iPhone or iPad, I’m in a similar position. I don’t own an iOS-based device. As I’m using libSDL2, I know it is possible to port to it, even without a Mac, but I would need to look into how to do so, and I would still need to invest in the devices to test on.

I am saving up for these things, but at the moment I don’t have them and I don’t want to spend time on them until I know what I’m doing.

And in the past it’s been difficult to hear back from people willing to be paid for porting a game for me, and volunteers have had difficulty figuring out how to put my project together on their system. I might look into it again, because that was years ago, and it’s a different world today.

GNU/Linux: distributing dependencies and architecture compatibilities

I develop and test the game on my Ubuntu GNU/Linux system, and the main thing to worry about there is that I can distribute the game and have it work out of the box on other distributions.

My game uses libSDL2 and related libraries. While I installed them on my system using my package manager, I can’t assume that my customers will have them installed as well.

Basically, I need to build custom dependencies, as per Troy Hepfner’s excellent article series on Linux Game Development, and then distribute them with my game.

Quite frankly, rather than worry about an installer to put everything in the correct locations on someone’s system, I think providing a basic tarball might be fine. Rather than provide .deb or .rpm or customer shell installers for each type of system, and then worrying about following the correct Linux Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, you allow the player to put the game in the directory of their choosing, extract it, and play.

But then I need to worry about how the tell the system to load the libraries. Running an application on Windows, the system generally looks in the local directory for libraries to depend upon. Unfortunately, Linux-based systems don’t do so, and while there is a way to point it towards your libraries using the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable, I also know that it is frowned upon to do so due to the security and compatibility issues it can introduce.

On the other hand, many popular commercial games on my system do just that. For instance, looking at the directory for Don’t Starve, I see:

$ cat bin/dontstarve.sh
#!/bin/bash
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=./lib64
./dontstarve

The fact that it is in this shell script wrapper is better than the original concern of changing the default environment variable in a more or less permanent way, which can cause version conflicts and such. It’s your program. You know what it needs, and any other applications that run will not be affected.

Still, supposedly the better way is to tell your binary at build time where to look, which isn’t very difficult. It requires -rpath=\$ORIGIN/[directory where you put your libs]. $ORIGIN expands into the directory that your binary is located.

So if the extracted tarball would have the following structure:
– foo-bin
– libs
– libfoo.so
– libbar.so

Then I would build foo-bin with -rpath=$ORIGIN/libs.

Of course, now foo-bin MUST be in the same directory as libs, but in practice, it’s fine. When was the last time you moved parts of a game’s files to different relative locations and expected it to continue to work?

I’m sure there’s issues with this approach as well, but with these two approaches, there’s plenty of precedent.

The only unknown I have is dealing with 32-bit vs 64-bit systems. Ubuntu has multiarch support, but I’ve seen comments on forums about people not being able to run an application due to architecture issues.

Don’t Starve distributes separate 64-bit and 32-bit builds. FTL, on the other hand, distributed both the 64-bit and 32-bit binaries and libraries together, and using a shell script, it determined which platform you were on at runtime to point LD_LIBRARY_PATH to the appropriate directory.

And other games distribute all desktop platforms together in one file, so if you bought the game, you bought it for Windows and Linux and Mac, whichever one you wish to play on. I like this option, especially since I hate the idea that I have to pay for a game twice in order to play on two different platforms.

I know some companies make their living by porting games and then selling them directly, but it’s not a business model I prefer.

Next time

In the next post, I will talk about issues specific to Android and Windows.



August 13, 2016


Episode 434: Windows Issues

from Casual Gamer Chick

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This week’s episode was delayed due to serious Windows issues this past week. The episode was saved, however, and is 90 minutes full of discussion. The podcast deals with a lot of console hardware rumors.

The news items include:

  • Rumor: PS4 Neo being unveiled in early September
  • Nintendo NX launch and spec details leak
  • Before you play Dishonored 2, you should finish the first game’s DLC says Arkane

All this and Listener Feedback.

This week’s episode was delayed due to serious Windows issues this past week. The episode was saved, however, and is 90 minutes full of discussion. The podcast deals with a lot of console hardware rumors. The news items include: Rumor: PS4 Neo being unveiled in early September Nintendo NX launch and spec details leak Before you play Dishonored 2, you should finish the first game’s DLC says Arkane All this and Listener Feedback.



August 12, 2016


Shadowhand developer vlog #4

from Grey Alien Games

We are really excited to share some cool active abilities and new sounds this week in Developer Vlog #4, on our unique RPG card game, Shadowhand.

This video gives further insight into how mini-deck building works in the inventory system, giving players the choice of ability cards to suit their own gameplay style. Whether you like to peek into the future to see what cards are coming up next, or just want to hit things with a gigantic hammer and see what shakes loose, there’s something for everyone.



August 11, 2016


New Pretty Good Solitaire Mac Edition v3.30 with 700 Games

from A Shareware Life

A new version of the Mac OS X version of Pretty Good Solitaire has been released.

Version 3.30 contains 100 new games, bringing the total number of games to 700.

The trial version can be downloaded from http://www.goodsol.com/mac.  If you have purchased, you can download the full version update from the link in your receipt email.

Pretty Good Solitaire Mac Edition runs in Snow Leopard, Lion, Mountain Lion, Mavericks, Yosemite, and El Capitan.

Here are the 100 new games:

Pgs700newgames



August 10, 2016


Weekday Escape N°130

from Jay Is Games

Weekday Escape N°130 So what are you escaping from this week? It's summer time, nobody wants to be at work (or cleaning out the fridge.) Lots of people are getting kids ready to go back to school, there are plenty of good excus... Tagged as: blog, browser, escape, free, game, ichima, pointandclick, primera, puzzle, strawberrycafe, weekday-escape




Tinker Island

from Jay Is Games

Platform: iOS, Android — Tinker Island Rescue your crew from a tropical isle in this free, offline-playable survival RPG for Android and iOS. Craft items, build improvements, explore the land, fend off wildlife and sort out what's going on with this eerie island! Tagged as: android, crafting, free, game, ios, ipad, iphone, microtransactions, mobile, rating-y, rpg, survival, tablet, tablet iap, trickytotem, upgrades



August 09, 2016


Shadowhand Dev Diary #6: Refreshments at the Rover’s Arms

from Grey Alien Games

What’s a rover?
The word “rover” originally described a pirate. A close relative of “reave,” there was no doubt that “roving” implied plunder in old England, rather than the gentler connotations of being a “wanderer” that the word suggests today.

Into the tavern
When our heroine, Shadowhand, seeks refuge, The Rover’s Arms extends its welcome; an inn packed with ruffians, serving hearty food and ales.

The British Pub today is an institution recognised by locals and visitors alike. Coaching inns were important pitstops in the 18th century, where travellers on long journeys could get fresh horses and grab a bite to eat. (A bit like a motorway service station).

On the menu
You could rely on an inn like The Rover’s Arms for a satisfying, traditional meal, like this seriously health-boosting steak and ale pie.

There are always a few drunks getting out of hand.

This chap has had one too many Tankards of Ale – which are great for the constitution but can slow your reflexes a bit in a brawl. And watch out, he has a hammer.

The refreshments are good but we can’t promise that the clientele are particularly desirable.

This rogue has a nasty brutal glove, and he’s been getting meaner by downing a dubious local beverage, Brute’s Brew, which is reputed to give a greater chance to stun.

It’s been fun, but Shadowhand should probably call it a night and move on…perhaps The Rover’s Arms is a bit of a sketchy venue, after all.




Dreams and Reality

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — Dreams and Reality When was the last you had a dream? Not the Deep Sleep kind of one, but a real dream, a life goal, something that you wanted to achieve. The hero of this short platform game has dreams, and rather... Tagged as: browser, flash, free, game, platformer




Rullo

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — Rullo While making my way through the net, looking for flash games to play, I've found this little gem. The game Rullo by Elihu Gideon and developed by Crescentyr, is one of those games that follow the concept of simple rules,... Tagged as: browser, flash, free, game, puzzle



August 08, 2016


The Satisfaction of Building It Yourself

from GBGames

I like building my games with my own tech.

There was a game jam in which I used Stencyl, but otherwise, all of my projects have been based on my own hand-coded C++ with libSDL. I spent time figuring out how to write a basic game loop, how to design my software architecture, how to create simple buttons to interface with, and more.

It’s time I could have been spending designing games rather than implementing them. I know this fact.

And yet, I persist.

Over the years, I’ve been told to switch to Flash, or use an engine like Torque 2D or Unity. When XNA was released, I remember wondering if C# was going to become the dominant programming language in game development.

But my C++ game engine is still with me, and still relevant. Granted, it’s not as full-featured as some systems, and the asset pipeline is still a manual effort. But what it does feature is well-tested, and I know how it works.

There’s something about learning how to build it from scratch that makes development more enjoyable. My A* pathfinding algorithm might make oddly suboptimal paths, but learning how the algorithm works and figuring out how to implement it was a fantastic experience.

Debug Path

As you can see from this 2010 development shot of what ultimately became Stop That Hero!, the AI hero should have followed something like that yellow line rather than the path it actually took.

It’s sort of like doing my own home repairs. There are some things I’ll leave to well-paid experts, but other things shouldn’t be too difficult to do. For instance, replacing the toilet’s fill valve and flapper took a small trip to the hardware store to get a replacement part and then a few minutes of work.

A bigger project I finished recently involved putting lockable doors on shelves we have in the basement. My wife and I are getting licensed to become foster parents, and part of the requirements for our home’s safety include keeping flammable materials such as paint in a locked storage area.

Rather than buy a big expensive cabinet, I thought, “We already have these wooden shelves in the basement. How hard could it be to put up a piece of wood with some hinges and a padlock?”

Basement Shelf With Paint Cans

I measured the area I needed to cover. I bought the wood and had the guy at the store cut it for me as I didn’t own a power saw myself. I learned the screws for the hinges were longer than the wood was deep, and I found that you could get 1x4s to frame the wood to make it look nice while also giving the door the thickness needed for those screws.

Gizmo helping with 1x4s

Plywood, 1x4s, and a drill

Framed plywood

Spray painted doors

Door mounted with hinges

Finished product

In the end, the doors looked nice enough and were functional, although they are not perfectly centered, as you can see. It turned out that the dimensions I measured didn’t take into account parts of the shelf protruding in ways that would prevent the doors from fitting perfectly. The good news is that they look homemade. B-)

Now, it took some time. I had to go to the hardware store a couple of times to get all of the materials, and I had to spend time on it when I could have been doing something more important, like working on finishing my game before we have foster children in the house. Did this time and effort translate into a better return on investment than the $90 cabinet I thought we could avoid buying?

No. In fact, we probably overspent on the wood and other materials for other projects.

But there are some benefits to having done it myself.

One, I learned 1x4s are not actually 1 inch by 4 inches. I never knew this fact, but when you buy wood, you need to expect your 1x4s will be 0.75 inches by 3.5 inches. It’s about how the wood is when it is cut and rough versus when it is dry, planed, and made ready for sale. It’s just one of those things that I now know for future projects. Luckily, the screws I had to attach the 1×4 to the plywood weren’t too long, but that could have been another trip to the hardware store since I was expecting the nominal dimensions to be the actual dimensions.

Two, I discovered that I can improvise a carpentry job. I had not made plans, yet I was able to put together some decent looking doors. When I ran into trouble, such as finding out that the doors wouldn’t fit where I expected them, I was able to shift them to different parts of the existing shelf and keep going. I could easily have given up when I found out that the doors were just a little too big, but I made it work. If I was doing kitchen cabinetry, I would have been more careful, but this project was more about the functionality than the aesthetics.

Three, I have the pride of saying, “I built that myself.” There’s nothing like that feeling.

My game development efforts might result in projects that are somewhat askew like my basement shelf doors are. It might take me longer. The end result might be less than what I could have gotten had I leveraged someone else’s efforts.

I know.

But I am a much stronger developer than I was in the past mostly because of all of the from-scratch efforts I have put in. I did the research myself. I explored from first principles rather than taking the shortcut of an existing path. I understand the trade-offs involved in design decisions rather than accepting decisions made for me.

And in the end, when I release a game, I can say proudly, “I built that myself.”

It won’t likely be important to my customers. And it won’t likely be important to you. But as an indie game developer, I don’t have to pay attention to your criteria for what’s the best approach.

I can build it myself, a process I enjoy.

And next time, I will be more experienced and knowledgeable than I was before.



August 06, 2016


Episode 433: Kickstarter Fail

from Casual Gamer Chick

No Gravatar

The episode is posted a little late due to unforeseen circumstances, and focuses on Kickstarter videogames, both failures and successes. The podcast also asks Pokémon Go fans if they really needed those tracking software for the game.

This week’s news includes:

  • “Other surprises” in store for NX, says Ubisoft
  • Fixes promised for botched Marvel Ultimate Alliance ports
  • Pokémon Go fans rage as tracking site shuts down
  • PlayStation VR requires about 60-square feet of space to use

Let us know what you think.

The episode is posted a little late due to unforeseen circumstances, and focuses on Kickstarter videogames, both failures and successes. The podcast also asks Pokémon Go fans if they really needed those tracking software for the game. This week’s news includes: “Other surprises” in store for NX, says Ubisoft Fixes promised for botched Marvel Ultimate Alliance ports Pokémon Go fans rage as tracking site shuts down PlayStation VR requires about 60-square feet of space to use Let us know what you think.



August 03, 2016


Riddle Transfer 2

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — Riddle Transfer 2 After ten years and seven instalments the artist formerly known as Jonbro wraps up the point-and-click 'Riddle' saga with the immensely enjoyable Riddle Transfer 2. Be warned that there are plot spoilers ahead but come on, seriously the series is... Tagged as: browser, flash, free, game, pointandclick




Monkey Happy 1-4

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — Monkey Happy 1-4 "Hey Hey they're the MONKEYS!!" OK maybe it's just me but I love these little guys. There's something inherently playful and mischievous about them that makes me smile. Seeing that PencilKids had made yet another installment had me immediately...um postponing... Tagged as: adventure, browser, escape, flash, free, game, pointandclick, puzzle, rating-g



August 02, 2016


Witches' Legacy: Dark Days to Come Walkthrough

from Casual Game Guides

Our Witches' Legacy: Dark Days to Come Collector's Edition Walkthrough is teeming with useful advice, step by step instructions and illustrated screen caps to guide you through this latest installment of the popular Witches’ Legacy series. Join us on an epic journey to save your girlfriend, Anabel. She has been abducted by the ice twins and swept into a magical realm, as she is the only one who can restore their power. Hurry adventure waits as you venture to save humanity in this fantastic hidden objects game!



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Shadowhand Dev Diary #5: It’s a holdup!

from Grey Alien Games

Becoming an outlaw
In this blog post I’m going to share a little bit about the heroine’s journey from aristocrat to outlaw in our RPG card game, Shadowhand.

Transformation
Lady Cornelia Darkmoor takes on a new identity as the eponymous highway thief, Shadowhand. This enables her to cross the boundaries from polite society – with it’s various rules and expectations – into the darker, lawless world of late 18th century smugglers, vagabonds and thieves.

In over her head
On one of her early missions, Shadowhand holds up a horse-drawn coach leaving a ball. Two wealthy young aristocrats are inside. Shadowhand begins to strip them of their valuables and their coachman attempts to fight back.

His dog may look adorable, but it can also be used as a weapon.

Training
Shadowhand soon realises that she needs more skills to succeed as an outlaw. Throughout the game she takes various opportunities to improve her ability with different weapons. She often trains with people she meets in the daytime, as Lady Cornelia. A lady can do a little shooting or fencing for sport after all…

Payback
Lady Cornelia/Shadowhand hones her abilities and of course gets better gear and an increasingly wide range of attack strategies to choose from as the game progresses. And that’s just as well, because people she quarrelled with earlier could come back for revenge. Our female aristocrat from the coach holdup is a case in point, as she’s scouring the moors on horseback with hounds and a riding whip looking for vengeance.

Or maybe she just wants her jewellery back.

Shadowhand may be able to cross the line from heiress to criminal, but she also has to take the consequences. Fighting for justice is a risky business.



August 01, 2016


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The Soul Stone Escape

from Jay Is Games

Platform: Flash — The Soul Stone Escape So often a journey begins with a story. A few simple words can carry you on an adventure as great as any begun with a single step. This fact is the starting point of Esklavos' new game The Soul Stone... Tagged as: browser, escape, esklavos, flash, free, game, pointandclick, puzzle, rating-o