August 10, 2018


Episode 511: Grim Sky at Riot

from Casual Gamer Chick

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The guys discuss the recent report by Kotaku released this week on the shady institutionalized sexism at Riot Games, the people behind League of Legends. There’s also hints of racism as well, especially since everyone in charge is, well, a white male. Otherwise, T.J. gushes about his experiences at EVO, the fighting game convention/competition, and is looking forward to QuakeCon.

The news this week includes:

And Jonah confesses he still hasn’t played GTA5 because, well, GTA4 soured him on the series.

The guys discuss the recent report by Kotaku released this week on the shady institutionalized sexism at Riot Games, the people behind League of Legends. There’s also hints of racism as well, especially since everyone in charge is, well, a white male. Otherwise, T.J. gushes about his experiences at EVO, the fighting game convention/competition, and is looking forward to QuakeCon. The news this week includes: Siege’s next season Operation Grim Sky unveiled The World Ends With You for Switch gets release date IGN pulls review and fires writer for plagiarism Grand Theft Auto 5 still going strong after five years And Jonah confesses he still hasn’t played GTA5 because, well, GTA4 soured him on the series.



August 03, 2018


Pumpkin on her Favorite Chair

from A Shareware Life

Pumpkinfavchair




Friday CatBlogging - Pumpkin

from A Shareware Life

150424pumpkin




Pumpkin Sleeping

from A Shareware Life

Pumpkinsleep



August 02, 2018


Episode 510: Red Dead Surprise

from Casual Gamer Chick

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This week’s episode didn’t initially have a Gaming Flashback, but the crew accidentally started one with 2010’s Red Dead Redemption, which shouldn’t be a flashback since it fails the “10 Year Rule”, but it was so fun to talk about, it became one. They also found some interesting stuff in a thin-news week, which is the usual for Summer.

The news includes:

  • Valve adds temporary fix for fake item scams on Steam
  • Halo devs not working on Battle Royale mode for Infinite
  • Nintendo Switch sales near 20m, down slightly on last year
  • Playground Games staffs up for the rumored Fable reboot

Let us know what you think.

This week’s episode didn’t initially have a Gaming Flashback, but the crew accidentally started one with 2010’s Red Dead Redemption, which shouldn’t be a flashback since it fails the “10 Year Rule”, but it was so fun to talk about, it became one. They also found some interesting stuff in a thin-news week, which is the usual for Summer. The news includes: Valve adds temporary fix for fake item scams on Steam Halo devs not working on Battle Royale mode for Infinite Nintendo Switch sales near 20m, down slightly on last year Playground Games staffs up for the rumored Fable reboot Let us know what you think.




Another Pumpkin Pic

from A Shareware Life

150227Pumpkin



August 01, 2018


Farewell to Pumpkin

from A Shareware Life

Yesterday our cat Pumpkin died.  She was 14 years old.  She had been ill for a couple of months.

Pumpkin was a female orange cat (which are rare).  She was adopted in 2004.

This is the first picture of Pumpkin as a kitten:

PumpkinFirstPic

Pumpkin was a very friendly cat to me, although she didn't much like other people.  She considered Random, our other orange cat, as her kitten after he was adopted in 2007.

 

Here is a recent picture of Pumpkin:

File-2

More pictures of Pumpkin are in the CatBlogging topic here on the blog: http://blog.goodsol.com/catblogging .

We now have 3 cats again:  Random (11 years old), and the calico former kittens Bandit and Caramel (2 years old).

 

 

 




Time Twins Mosaics for PC Windows released

from Anawiki

The Time Twins and friends want to lead you on a tour of the past. Choose a character and join the team as you travel through decades and centuries, reliving the history of travel, industry and invention.

Time Twins Mosaics picross game screenshot

If you’re a fan of picross games, you’re going to love Time Twins Mosaics. And if you’ve never tried one, there’s no time like the present! Use numeric clues to place multi-colored tiles into a grid and reveal a picture. You’ll start with some fun and easy puzzles in the early Industrial Era, but by the time you’ve reached the Space Age, you’ll be faced with big, multi-colored grids sure to test the wits of even the most seasoned puzzle-solver.

This is no ordinary picross game, however, and the fun doesn’t stop with a single puzzle. The images you’ll uncover within each stage form parts of a larger depiction of the era in question. Finish the stage, and watch the scene you’ve assembled come to life before your eyes!

Time Twins Mosaics picross game screenshot

Time Twins Mosaics is both relaxing and challenging, and sometimes surprising! It features 100 levels across 20 different stages, each corresponding to a different period in modern history, from the days of coal and steam up through the dawn of space travel.

Download Time Twins Mosaics for PC Windows
Buy Time Twins Mosaics for PC Windows



July 29, 2018


A Goodbye to Diego, My Favorite Pair Partner

from GBGames

At 2:44am, I watched my cat Diego take his final breath. He was about 15 years old, and I knew him for 12 of those years.

Diego

12 years ago, I was living in Chicago and visiting friends in Iowa, and I learned that their neighbor’s daughter was getting married to someone who was deathly allergic to her cats. She was looking for a new home for them, and since I happened to be interested in getting a couple of cats at the time, I took in Diego and his sister Gizmo when they were three years old.

I was told that he was named Diego because he looked like Diego from the movie Ice Age.

Gizmo and Diego

I quickly learned that Diego was a greeter. While his sister hid until she was sure the new people were safe, Diego was always interested in finding out who the new guests were right away.

Greeter

I remember when I was working at a company that made slot machines, and I was in crunch. So, I would leave early, come back late, and I would feel dead inside. I would plop myself onto the couch or a chair, and soon the cats would drape themselves across me. Diego would especially love to curl up with me. Napping together was great.

Me and Diego
Diego and Me
Diego cuddle time
Diego and Me

Even when I was not involved in crunch, whenever I came home, Diego would get up from whatever he was doing, meow frantically, and come see me. I would often pick him up and carry him, and he sometimes put his front paws around me like he was a child being carried by a parent.

I would whistle a certain way, and he often meowed in response, and every so often he would come to me, which was a neat party trick, except he never seemed to want to do it at parties or when other people were present.

Diego is hamming it up

Diego and his sister have been with me through five moves, two states, multiple Ludum Dare competitions, three jobs, and a few relationships. He has been my constant companion for almost a third of my life.

I don’t remember exactly when I realized he was growing old, but it was within the last few years. I might have been tossing him one of his toys and noticing that he was less interested in chasing it. He moved a little slower. But he was still playful, and he was fairly healthy throughout his life. I had to take him to the vet once to get some of his teeth pulled because they were not healthy, but he was fine.

I felt, however, I was on notice, and I realized that one day he might not be around anymore.

In the past couple of months, Gizmo had high blood glucose levels, and so she was on insulin to see if it would help. I changed their diet from dry food to wet food, as I read it can help with reversing diabetes. Gizmo’s levels dropped to the point that she no longer needed insulin, and she eventually bounced back to her old self.

Unfortunately, since I was so focused on Gizmo’s health and her eating habits, I didn’t notice when Diego stopped eating and drinking. They both lost weight, but I chalked it up to a better diet (they were both a bit on the heavy side), but at one point I realized that Diego felt a lot bonier than I could remember. I started to find him hanging out in strange areas, such as the upstairs bathroom, which is never a good sign in cats.

Last week we took him to a vet, and we made an appointment for an ultrasound for this coming Monday, but Diego’s health rapidly declined. It was very quick how he went from seeming perfectly fine to being on his death bed. I checked up on him throughout the day yesterday, but he got so weak that he could barely hold himself up.

My wife and I took shifts to stay with him last night, and when it was my turn, I found he was breathing very shallow breaths. He yowled a bit, and I had no idea if he could see me. I sang to him, talked to him, and pet him. I noticed his paw twitching, and every so often he would take a very large breath, stop breathing for a moment, then pick back up with the shallow breaths. It was awful.

At one point, I saw him stretch his paw out in front of him, which was a lot more movement than I had seen in a long while. A few moments later, he reared his head back, let out a deep groan of a sigh, and he was gone.

I am devastated. I don’t know why his health suddenly got so bad, and I hate that I didn’t see it earlier. I wish he didn’t have to go through as much suffering in his final moments as he did.

Diego, I love you. I will miss the way you climbed onto me whenever I was sitting or lying down. I will miss scratching you under your chin and seeing you close your eyes in contentment. I will miss dancing with you. I will miss your hugs. I will miss how you and Gizmo would curl up to sleep together. I will miss how it feels to come home and have you be one of the first to greet me as I walk in the door. I will miss how you would reach up to my face and pull it towards yours, probably to smell my breath or lick my chin.

I miss you.

My Favorite Pair Partner



July 27, 2018


A brief history of casual download games

from Grey Alien Games

In this blog post I’ll talk about what casual download games are, how they were/are sold and about the decline of the market.

What are “Casual Download Games”?

These days if I say “casual game” people immediately think I mean a mobile game such as Candy Crush. Many people don’t seem to realise that all those type of games used to be $20 downloadable games sold via “casual portals” like Big Fish Games etc. So I often use the term “casual download game for desktop” to clarify now.

Some people also used to call Flash games “casual” because you could play them online in short bursts and often with just a mouse. However, many of those games were action-oriented and not the sort of traditional casual game genre like match-3, hidden object game, time management game (e.g. Diner Dash), card game, word game etc.

When did the casual download portals appear?

Back before Steam indies sold their games from their own websites and from sites like download.com and other shareware sites.

It was very tough to make a living from that and so when some larger sites started to collate and sell decent quality games to larger audiences in the early 2000s, many devs rushed to get their games on those sites even though the developer rev share was often AWFUL (see below).

What are the main casual portals?

Here are some of the main ones:

- Big Fish Games (the biggest)
- Game House (was originally called Real Arcade)
- Zylom (they are owned by Game House and has localised versions of games)
- iWin (they bought Oberon Media and Pogo and more sites in the past I believe)
- Shockwave
- WildTangent Games
- GameFools
- Exent
- Alawar (Russian)
- Intenium/Gamigo (German)
- Boonty/Nexway (French)

Some of those sites also have/had Flash and Java games for people to play online, but most of their business is via downloadable casual games.

It’s also possible to sell casual games via Amazon, and the Apple App Store (for Mac), and other smaller sites. I’ve tried out a lot of sites over the years but many of them just weren’t worth it. Also some sites that were once good have become unreliable over time.

Developer Revenue Share

The best revshare I knew of was 40% (TO THE DEVS) for an “exclusive” deal, but 30%-35% was common and I have even seen less than 25%! Though in recent years I managed to snag a 50% deal for an exclusive which was pretty good. Remember that Steam, Apple, Google, Amazon offer 70%(ish) to developers, and some like Humble and itch.io offer even more!

However, due to the sheer volume of sales on the bigger casual sites it was once possible to make ok to good money from a casual download game when the market was booming, but only if you made the right type of game (more on this in a moment) and controlled the budget carefully.

What type of games do casual portals sell?

Early on you could often find arcade games on the casual portals as well as casual games. Reflexive (bought by Amazon in 2008) used to have platform games, brick beakers, and shoot ‘em ups on it for example. It was a really cool time in which I don’t recall casual games as being looked down on, but perhaps I have rose-tinted spectacles.

However, devs soon realised that the type of games that made the most money weren’t arcade games, but were match-3 games (e.g. Bejewelled), bubble poppers (e.g. Zuma), time management games, card games and so on. I realised this around 2005 and ditched a kung fu platform game I was working on and started making match-3 games instead! And the rest, as they say, is history…

Some genres didn’t exist in the early days, such as the Hidden Object Game (HOG) genre which was basically invented/made popular by Big Fish Games (I know the developer of the first big Hidden Object game, Mystery Case Files). Eventually HOGs evolved into Hidden Object Puzzle Adventures (HOPAs), and some of these are really good. In fact many casual games are excellent but most modern press and gamers totally ignore them, which is a shame.

Big Fish Games hired me as a contractor in 2007 to work with a designer who worked there called John Cutter on a game called Fairway Solitaire. That game was super-popular and ended up spawning many clones and variations over the years.

Other games like Build-a-lot started a new genre, and also My Kingdom for the Princess, and no doubt others did too. Farming games (in the Time Management genre) were pretty popular at one point before Farmville became huge on Facebook.

The holy grail back then was to spawn a new popular genre because you’d be leading the pack and people would measure new games in the genre against yours. Though it was incredibly difficult to do because the audience often viewed new experimental mechanics with suspicion and they almost always flopped.

What is good about the casual portals?

- They are curated stores and only take games in certain genres of a certain quality and only launch one a day max. Some launch less frequently. This means devs get front page coverage and a newsletter mention and even advertising paid for by the bigger sites!
- They set up a page for your game with screenshots and text, and some sites even make a video trailer for you. So it’s not much work for devs.
- Some do free localisation in exchange for a timed exclusive. Localised games can make decent money; at least I’ve always found it to be worth doing.
- Some others even did retail deals though I expect these have dried up now.
- Discounted sales used to be rare and were not deeply discounted (max 50% off iirc). They might be more common now but I haven’t checked for a while.
- The bigger site have dedicated customer support teams (and forums) so you don’t need to deal with support issues.
- The bigget sites QA games and make sure they adhere to minimum tech and usability standards.
- Some sites have a “launcher” for customers to keep track of all their games with, like the Steam app.
- Games seems to have a long tail on the casual portals. My 10 year old games still make money every month.
- Every developer has a developer relations rep, which is very handy for many things!

So basically they do a lot for their monstrous rev share.

What is bad about the casual portals?

- Because they are curated stores and they only take certain viable genres of games, you can’t just put any old game on there. Many indies wouldn’t want to be constrained by the type of games you have to make to sell on the casual portals, but I didn’t mind that in my early years because a) I enjoyed making and playing those games and b) they earned me money for my family.
- They choose your release date and sometimes it can take months for them to launch.
- You can’t update your game very easily. You have to have a decent reason for an update (like a major bug fix) in order to get it processed and online, and that might take months.
- The rev share sucks, but we already covered that.
- You cannot have any external links in your game such as to your site or your newsletter.
- You have to put THEIR splash screen in YOUR game :-o
- They own the customer details/emails etc. This is no different from Steam, Apple, Amazon to be fair.
- They often have a high minimum payment theshold of $500. This sucks if your game doesn’t make much money on there as you may never get paid!
- There is no real-time reporting. Mostly you have to wait months for a royalty report. Sometimes those reports have errors on them!
- They are mostly slower to pay than Steam and other indie game distributors.
- They might give away your game for free to customers! I found out that site gave away thousands of copies of Regency Solitaire as part of a customer loyalty scheme but I couldn’t do anything about it because it would have meant removing my game which was making decent money there.
- In recent years as the market, and sites, have continued their decline I have found some sites to be unreliable with a) royalty reports, b) payments, and c) getting replies to emails.

There are probably more things that aren’t great but that’s a pretty good list for starters.

Ultimately, despite the downsides, I have done pretty well from making and selling casual games over the years. None of them have made me rich because it’s not that sort of market where hits make millions, like Steam, but done right a decent career could be forged.

Demo versus subscription model

A bit like the old Shareware model, most casual download games can be downloaded for free but only run for an hour before they get shut down by special DRM and the player is encouraged to buy the full version. Essentially it’s a “pay wall”. Their saves are kept intact.

Back in the day it was said that a conversion rate of 100 downloads to 1 sale (1%) was good, but actually some of the best games could get double digit conversion rates if they were constructed well and left the player addicted and wanting more. One of mine once converted at 18% during launch month!

Some of the casual portals started a subscription style service where players could play whatever game they wanted for a fixed fee each month and developers would get a share depending on how long their game was played for. This actually worked out pretty well for my games because some of them have median play times of 5-10 hours (based on Steam stats), and that results in a lot of minutes played. One of my games had over 4 million minutes of play in the first month on a site.

However, my main concern with the subscription style model is that it ultimately devalues games imho and discourages people from purchasing them instead, which is what I’d prefer as an old-skool dev.

Pricing

Believe it or not, casual games used to sell for $19.99 on all the distribution sites! It was glorious. Games were valued decently.

Then after Amazon bought Reflexive they dropped game prices to $9.99 and all the casual portals followed suit. [EDIT: It's possible that Big Fish Games dropped their price to $9.99 first and Amazon and the rest quickly copied but it's hard to verify.]

Then some sites introduced discounts for “club members” who paid some kind of regular fee via credit card. This meant games could be bought for only $6.99.

To be fair, Big Fish Games later tried to address the low price of games by introducing “Collector’s Editions” which are $20 games with a bit more content than “Standard Editions”, though there were cheaper for club members of course.

So when you see indie games for $9.99, basically that price point came from a price war between the casual portals! It was their fault. Without them trying to capture market share, maybe indie games would be $20 still, or maybe mobile and F2P games would still have driven down the price anyway.

Market decline

It’s hard to say when the casual game market was booming but I’d say from like 2006-2013ish. Since then it’s been on a long slow decline. I say this based on talking to other casual devs about how their recent game launches have gone.

Why did it decline? Well I think that many players went over to Facebook when Farmville was big and eventually migrated to mobile and F2P games. Some hardcore casual gamers still use the casual portals and download games, but not in the same numbers as before.

Also another issue is that basically the quality bar kept rising, and as we’ve discussed, the price went down, and many players left for other platforms. This made it really hard for developers to make a profit due to the costs of making higher quality games and lower revenues. I know of multiple casual studios that closed down in recent years. The result is that, in my opinion, there’s less innovation and fewer really good quality casual games launched on those sites now, and maybe the customers have also become apathetic.

Steam and casual gamers

I enjoy shipping games on Steam due the tools (and being able to update easily), the decent revenue share, the real time reporting and so on. And so my hope is that casual gamers will eventually migrate from the casual portals to Steam.

However, Steam isn’t very appealing to casual gamers with it’s dark “gamer” theme and the inability to easily view old-fashioned casual game categories like match-3, HOG, card game etc. on a single landing page. If you browse “casual” on Steam, you’ll get a huge variety of games including “naughty” visual novels.

If Steam fixed that and basically made a really nice CURATED casual game landing page I think could poach a huge amount of sales from the casual portals. Remember that Big Fish Games sold TWICE for nearly $1B. That’s how big the market is, though admittedly a lot of that valuation has to do with recent mobile gambling games.

Anyway, I guess that’s it for now. I could have waffled about this stuff for considerably longer, but I’ve got some games to make.

Also, just to remind y’all, please go and buy my casual games here direct from us so that no third party gets a giant cut. Thanks!



July 25, 2018


Episode 509: Heatwave LA

from Casual Gamer Chick

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This week was a hot time for Jonah — really hot time as Los Angeles was sweltering and the Arctic was literally on fire. However, that didn’t stop the crew from doing the podcast (albeit a day late), though the news was a bit thin again.

The news items for the week include:

  • The C64 Mini is coming to North America on October 9
  • Datamined logo offers more evidence Taiko Drum Master for Switch is coming West
  • Next Xbox will focus on “XCloud” game streaming
  • GOG: Classic console games “might be possible”

The Question of the Week: “What little known game did you love?”

This week was a hot time for Jonah — really hot time as Los Angeles was sweltering and the Arctic was literally on fire. However, that didn’t stop the crew from doing the podcast (albeit a day late), though the news was a bit thin again. The news items for the week include: The C64 Mini is coming to North America on October 9 Datamined logo offers more evidence Taiko Drum Master for Switch is coming West Next Xbox will focus on “XCloud” game streaming GOG: Classic console games “might be possible” The Question of the Week: “What little known game did you love?”




Moai 6: Unexpected Guests for Game Night, Date Night

from Casual Game Guides

Another week and another time out for Game Night, Date Night with James and Abby. This week they'll put their resource management skills to the test with the new Moai Game, Moai 6 Unexpected Guests. Will this game provide better entertainment than the last date night fizzle? Will they be able to entertain the new island visitors? Will Abby let James play at all? Find out in this week's Game Night, Date Night!



» Moai VI: Unexpected Guests Walkthrough & Forum

» Moai VI: Unexpected Guests Free Trial & Related Games



July 18, 2018


Episode 508: Marriage

from Casual Gamer Chick

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TJ announces his nuptials the previous week, finally marrying his live-in girlfriend of 10 years. All that, and many parables that had to be cut from the podcast lest it last 90 minutes.

That said, there’s plenty of news this week:

Let us know if you spent $50,000 on a virtual spaceship.

TJ announces his nuptials the previous week, finally marrying his live-in girlfriend of 10 years. All that, and many parables that had to be cut from the podcast lest it last 90 minutes. That said, there’s plenty of news this week: The Battlefield 5 beta will take place in early September Rainbow Six Siege now insta-banning players using hate speech Pokemon GO Fest attendance announced Star Citizen refund refusals Let us know if you spent $50,000 on a virtual spaceship.



July 16, 2018


Shadowhand postmortem – Top ten takeaways

from Grey Alien Games

We recently did a detailed postmortem of our RPG card game, Shadowhand. Going over every aspect of the project honestly and in depth generated 23 pages of notes about what we got right, and, importantly, what we got wrong and how we could improve next time.

We have distilled our findings into a checklist of ten points, which we can use for future projects. We are sharing it so that you can avoid making the same mistakes with your indie game project (or, hopefully, reassure yourself that you are on track.)

1 Pitching
Pitch your project to more than one publisher and/or funding body.

Listen to their feedback and think about it carefully. You are entering a long-term business relationship with them. As well as securing funding, your pitch and design document (yes we had one!) are part of the process of clarifying to yourself what you are offering and why players should care.

2 Budget
Pay yourselves and your contractors properly.

Ensure that you genuinely have a big enough budget to do this for the duration of the project. When it comes to contractors, you get what you pay for. But conversely, don’t be tempted to pay more than you need to, or can afford, for assets or services. Be realistic about the scale of your project, and how likely the extra spend is to make a difference to sales in the long run because you could just be wasting money (and time) on unneeded content.

3 Schedule
Make a realistic schedule and try to stick to it.

In our case our schedule was unrealistic and with hindsight, revealed that our project really needed an art director (or a different scope, see below).

We should have built in a lot more contingency time for predicable things, such as attending shows and conferences; and for random curveballs and disasters, such as a runaway moth infestation and a very sick child.

4 Scope
Have you got the scope right?

How long do players expect your game to be for the price? How much content does it really need? Does your team have the skills and capacity to deliver this or do you need to pay contractors who can help? How big is the market for your game?

Speaking as a tiny team who delivered an incredibly rich and complex game that we are extremely proud of, but which is probably twice as long as it needed to be, we suggest you think very carefully about this. Your reasons for making a game, financial and emotional resources, and potential market will vary.

5 Publisher
Find the right publisher for your project.

Try to find a publisher who gives you a fair deal in terms of advance and recoup, and is great at marketing support. It is also worth considering the other products in their portfolio. Are they a good match for your game and therefore likely to drive their existing customers to you?

It also goes without saying that you need a solid contract that covers all eventualities.

6 Testing
Test when ready and allow time to process the results. In-house testing can also be a powerful development tool.

Taking your game to a show early in development and having the public play it is a great way to get feedback and test that the core loop is fun.

Taking the time to code a dedicated testing system may also be worthwhile. In our case, a rapid simulation of thousands of duels proved invaluable for balancing the RPG elements of our game.

Consider the timing of testing carefully. Don’t rush to pay for testing – wait until your game is at the correct stage to make the most of the results and feedback you will get. Conversely, towards the end of the project, make sure you leave enough time after getting results from your beta testers to make full use of them before you ship!

7 PR & Marketing
Know your strengths and plan ahead

If you plan to attend shows, think about timing, and whether the spend is worth it. In our case, a show early on in the development cycle was actually very useful in proving that our concept and core gameplay were fun and marketable. However, we attended too many shows at an early stage, and they were all UK-based. Exhibiting at shows closer to launch or across different continents may have been a better use of that budget.

Be honest with yourself about your strengths and weaknesses in PR and marketing, and be prepared to ask for assistance. Our PR reach is good for an indie microstudio and our publisher has considerable expertise in marketing. But there were still things we could have improved upon, such as connecting with streamers and the American press.

8 Launch
Plan this in as much detail as possible.

Launching will probably be a stressful time so keeping a cool head and having good checklists is a must.

Don’t make changes to the build hours or minutes before launch…(yeah, we did this and it screwed up.)

9 Sustaining post-launch momentum
Make yourself available

Remember that if your PR efforts have been successful, you can expect to spend the next few weeks helping various media professionals to discuss your game via podcasts, streams, written interviews and so on. Also you’ll be fending off a huge volume of fake Steam key requests.

Despite the huge effort of getting the game finished and the understandable desire to take a break, this is when sustained promotion and making yourself available pays off.

10 Customer support
Be responsive but also selective

Scheduling time post-launch to keep up with discussions, forums and reviews is important. We have made a number of updates to the game post-launch to fix various minor issues or add things to the game based on player feedback. Go for the changes that give the “biggest bang for your buck” though. The amount of time you invest in this should be proportional to the number of players who will benefit, and the likely effect on future Steam review scores.

A final note on decision-making
Our project took over two years and involved a great deal of decision-making, both at the meta/business level and at the micro/game design level. As we were taking these decisions throughout the project, the majority of them seemed to be logical, sensible business decisions backed up by numbers and facts.

In hindsight, it is much clearer to us how many of those decisions were in fact based on emotions – both positive and negative – that largely fall into two categories: being very excited for our project and putting too much into it; and trying to avoid tasks or situations that we found difficult.

Going forward, we will come up with a stronger logical framework for approaching our decisions, and simultaneously acknowledge that emotion plays a large part in the choices we make and so reframe our discussions accordingly.

A big takeaway for us is to make time to understand the emotions that drive or hinder a project. We hope this will make us a better and more productive team in future.

What key takeaways did you have after completing your last project? Let us know in the comments.

Helen Carmichael @bchezza &
Jake Birkett @greyalien



July 11, 2018


Abby Plays Alicia Quatermain 3: The Mystery of the Flaming Gold

from Casual Game Guides

Abby uses her solo game time this week to play the new time management game Alicia Quatermain 3: The Mystery of the Flaming Gold. Say that five times fast! Will this time management game hold up to the hopes and dreams of a fast paced gaming queen? Or will her cries of disappointment wake up the kids? Let's find out in this week's game review! 



» Alicia Quatermain 3: The Mystery of the Flaming Gold Walkthrough & Forum

» Alicia Quatermain 3: The Mystery of the Flaming Gold Free Trial & Related Games